Hi there! I am having some major computer issues and cannot access Tumblr from my home computer at this time. I’m still here! I’m trying to get the issue resolved but since my computer geek friends don’t know what’s wrong with it (always comforting), I don’t know when it’ll get fixed. So, I’ll be back as soon as I can!

with-grace-and-guts:

This is my space by Kahoumono on Flickr.
data2364:

https://twitter.com/Data2364/status/518325029692784641/photo/1
karlurbaninternational:

http://trekmovie.com/2014/10/03/dst3-urban-star-trek-2016-concept-is-phenomenal-montgomery-ent-s5-not-going-to-happen-more/
Karl Urban: Star Trek 2016 Concept is Phenomenal 
Ross asked Karl Urban about the script for the new Star Trek movie and Urban said he had not read it, but he had heard some things. Here is what he said:

"I’m am going to meet with JJ [Abrams] in a couple of days and I’m looking forward to that. And the important thing is that it is going to be phenomenal. Based on what I hear of the concept, it’s going to rock and you guys are going to love it. "

Being that Karl Urban is probably the biggest Trek fan on the cast (with the possible exception of Simon Pegg) that news was met with thunderous applause by the crowd.

karlurbaninternational:

http://trekmovie.com/2014/10/03/dst3-urban-star-trek-2016-concept-is-phenomenal-montgomery-ent-s5-not-going-to-happen-more/

Karl Urban: Star Trek 2016 Concept is Phenomenal

Ross asked Karl Urban about the script for the new Star Trek movie and Urban said he had not read it, but he had heard some things. Here is what he said:

"I’m am going to meet with JJ [Abrams] in a couple of days and I’m looking forward to that. And the important thing is that it is going to be phenomenal. Based on what I hear of the concept, it’s going to rock and you guys are going to love it. "

Being that Karl Urban is probably the biggest Trek fan on the cast (with the possible exception of Simon Pegg) that news was met with thunderous applause by the crowd.

(via boborci)

yourstruggle:

shmurdapunk:

lacomeobejas:

latinagabi:

postracialcomments:

Ferguson 10/03/2014

Military operations

These people are in my thoughts ❤️

shit

people are going to die

be careful, stay woke

(via stellarbisexual)

kiranwearsscienceblue:

In all seriousness though -

Star Trek is more than a fandom. It is a philosophy.

It’s the belief in a better and brighter future for humanity. 

It’s about building up from a horrific past of a war-torn world to create a beautiful future in which hunger and poverty no longer exists.

It’s about unity - making friends and alliances across the galaxy with a diverse set of cultures, from human to Klingon to Cardassian.

It’s about recognizing the value of life even when it looks so different from anything we know - silcon-based, artificial intelligence, etc. 

And it’s about being the best person you can ever possibly be. 

It’s about learning Latin when you’re in the Academy to be an Engineer. 

It’s about keeping up with the humanities while you’re surrounded by the most advanced science we can conceive. 

It’s about striving to be something greater, something perhaps it would be impossible for you to ever obtain, because it’s the journey that’s more important than the destination. 

It’s about progress - in equal parts scientific and humanitarian. 

Star Trek isn’t just about the characters or the plot; what makes Star Trek what it is is the driving philosophy behind it, Roddenberry’s vision. 

Most fans I see love Star Trek as much for the philosophy as for anything else. And for those who take the philosophy to heart, it becomes a lifestyle. A lifestyle of progress, growth, and endless possibilities. 

(Source: kiranwearsscienceblues, via longlivethetribbles)

shesfiction:

twoshotsofhappyoneshotofsad:

discoveringfeminism:

deforest:

Joan Crawford in Possessed (1931)

82 years later and it’s still relevant

This will never not be relevant.

82 years and we still have to fucking tell men this shit

(via wintry-mix)

I was busy today!

 Yesterday I bought 50 lbs of apples and today I canned six half-pints of apple butter, six half-pints of grape jelly, four pints of regular applesauce and six pints of vanilla-maple applesauce.  My home smells delicious!

I still have empty jars, so I’m going back to the farm tomorrow for more late pears (pear butter) and more apples - still need PIE APPLES.  CAN’T FORGET PIE.

im-a-pr0blem:

I hate everything.

im-a-pr0blem:

I hate everything.

(via bikerideoceanside)

Well, sir, volatile is all relative.

(Source: giidas, via boborci)

imadoctornotadragonslayer:

trekkiefeminist:

as-my-frozen-pulse-quickens:

soong-type-princess:

pintoinlove:

hopeforyouyet:

trekkiefeminist:

Really encouraged to see so many people starting to speak up about the issues on the official Star Trek Facebook page, and imagining the potential of positive change. The above is a selection of comments left on the Change.org petition for CBS and StarTrek.com to develop a comments policy to address the sexist, racist and homophobic comments on the Facebook page, and appoint moderators to enforce it.

Have you signed the petition yet? If not, what are you waiting for?

There are only 339 signatories to the petition so far — come on Tumblr — we can make that tens of thousands, can’t we?

PLEASE! Everyone go and sign this! So, so important!

Only 27 more sigs needed!!!!

Okay, listen. As terrible as racist, homophobic, obnoxious comments are, they are not doing anything they are not allowed to do so long as they are not directed at someone specific. Freedom of speech works both ways. :(

The response to the petition so far has been overwhelmingly supportive, but I wanted to address this, I think well-intentioned, misconception that implementing a comments policy and page moderation in any way infringes on freedom of speech.

Freedom of speech is a hugely important right, one that I rely on daily as a feminist blogger and media commentator. But the right to freedom of speech (read the wording of the First Amendment for a good example) is meant to prohibit government suppression of speech, not to say that private citizens and organizations must, in their own spaces, accept any and all speech from others.

So let’s just say, for example, I wanted to express an opinion that others might find controversial, like: “Jonathan Archer is the best Star Trek captain ever and anyone who doesn’t agree is an idiot.” (Don’t worry, that’s never going to happen).

I am guaranteed the right to say that in my house. I can have a banner printed up and hold it while I wave at passing cars. I can start my own blog about how great Archer is and how stupid everyone who doesn’t like him is. I can even stand on a street corner and hand out pro-Archer pamphlets and try to strike up conversations with random members of the public…

But I can’t force them to stay and listen if they don’t want to. I can’t stand in the middle of a city street with my banner and disrupt traffic. I can’t walk into the middle of a Macy’s and stand on a crate with a megaphone and shout my love for Archer. I can’t invite myself to a Captain Janeway fan club meeting at someone’s house and go off on a vicious anti-Janeway rant and call everyone there idiots; they’d be well within their rights to kick me out of their space for being a jerk.

Similarly, corporate entities like CBS and StarTrek.com (as well as Facebook) have the right to determine who gets to use their space under what terms. 

I can’t even come close to listing all the major, mainstream, legitimate organizations that have comments policies for their websites and/or social media similar to what this campaign is asking for. But I did make a list of a handful of particular policies that specifically address sexism, racism and homophobia, and that seem to be working well. 

What we have on the Star Trek Facebook page is not free speech; it is free reign for a loud minority to spew sexist, racist and homophobic comments, and to troll and intimidate those who object, thereby silencing the voices of many women, people of colour, and LGBT fans.

Freedom of speech is so often misconstrued as being the right to say anything and not receive backlash or have any action taken against you for it. It is merely the right to say anything without government interference. People can and will call a person out if they are being a hateful bigot. Website and Facebook page administrators do have the right to remove comments and ban individuals at their discretion. Their right to freedom of speech is not being violated as they are still free to say those things in their own home, they are free to post them on a website that does not have a moderation policy prohibiting them, they are free to create their own website and post those things on it (though there are usually limitations to free speech, for example advocating violence against a group of people).

Websites with comprehensive comments policies forbidding hate speech, offensive slurs, personal attacks, etc. often have the most vibrant communities of people who discuss, debate, and disagree with each other respectfully; sites that allow people spouting offensive garbage usually end up haemorrhaging those respectful individuals because there is no room left for civil discourse when the dialogue is primarily composed of offensive content. Who wants to stick around and discuss and debate issues when every time you post you have people calling you names and attacking you personally?

The official Star Trek Facebook page COULD become a great place for people to discuss Star Trek, have lively debates, keep up to date on news, share information, talk about what they’d like to see from the franchise in the future, etc. Instead, it is currently a place overrun with sexist, racist, homophobic and transphobic individuals who enjoy posting offensive comments and attacking anyone who calls them out on it. People who don’t want to be exposed to that kind of behaviour are leaving in droves and the page is becoming a dumping ground for offensive garbage with little meaningful contribution.

Nobody is asking the page to ban dissent. There is a vast difference between “I don’t think Janeway was a good captain because her actions in X instance caused Y problems” and “I hate Janeway, she’s such a fucking bitch”. Right now, most of the comments on the page are of the latter variety – often much, much worse.

Moderation is not censorship. In places with freedom of speech laws, people shouting offensive comments have a right to shout them without government interference; but the Star Trek franchise also has the right to say “we don’t want you doing it on our Facebook page or our website”. That’s a right we’re asking them to exercise in order to make the page a welcoming place for fans of all races, orientations, gender identities, and abilities.

(via ormondhsacker)

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully EffectOne of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.
— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully Effect

One of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.

Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.

The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.

— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

(via mulders)

trektweets:

The Best Tweet of All Time.

(via trekbedtimestories)


Green Wheat Field (detail), Vincent Van Gogh, 1890

Green Wheat Field (detail), Vincent Van Gogh, 1890

(Source: seeliequeene, via lets-be-psychostogether)